veggies

April 2019 Nutrition Newsletter

If you think popping a multivitamin or vitamin C tablet daily will prevent you from getting a chronic illness, think again. While nearly 50% of Canadians and over 65% of Americans take vitamins, minerals, antacids or other nutritional supplements, most science does not support their use.

My “snake oil radar” often goes up when I read claims for other supplements. Take fish oil, for example. The bottle says, “promotes heart, brain, vision, and joint health,” yet studies on omega-3-fatty acid supplements with the above claims have been inconclusive and downright “fishy.” Fish oil does lower triglycerides and may help relieve the pain of rheumatoid arthritis, but it does not reduce the risk of heart disease or slow the progression of age-related macular degeneration. Eating fish twice per week, by contrast, has been advised by the American Heart Association to lower the risk of heart disease, especially fatty fish like salmon. Fish replaces higher-fat protein sources such as beef or pork and has been linked with a reduction in heart disease . By Lisa Andrews, MEd, RD, LD

April 2019 Nutrition Newsletter